College students prove to be more stressed

Ashley Inge—

Staff Writer

Studies show that college can be an extremely stressful time for young adults. Research shows that it is important for students to learn to manage their stress effectively because it could have a detrimental effect on their health and performance during college.

According to BestColleges.com, surveys that were conducted by Kansas State University reported that students are experiencing higher levels of stress than “students in previous decades, and the numbers keep getting higher.” Also, research shows that “suicide rates amongst college-aged students are three times higher than they were in 1950.”

According to stress.org, there are numerous emotional and physical disorders that have been linked to stress including depression, anxiety, heart attacks, stroke, hypertension, immune system disturbances as well as many other disorders.

This photo illustration is a depiction of a Tarleton student studying and being stressed. Photo illustration by Ashley Ingle, Texan News.

This photo illustration is a depiction of a Tarleton student studying and being stressed.
Photo illustration by Ashley Ingle, Texan News.

According to BestColleges.com, students can experience stress due to heavy course loads, exams, grade performance, new levels of independence, work schedules, romantic relationships and various other reasons.

Although stress can take a toll on students, there are some ways to manage it effectively.

The director of the center for academic readiness and success at Tarleton State University, Brenda Faulkner, says there are some easy ways to help cope with stress. Faulkner said, “I think that if it’s every day stress then, sleep, eating right, exercise, the same things we hear over and over again can help. If the stress goes beyond a natural level and you get into that fight or flight mode, then you might want to talk to a friend, a confidant or the counseling center.”

Faulkner said, “A lot of times we get more in our head about thinking about the problem, than the problem is worth. My dad always said, ‘if you worry about something that’s going to happen, 90 percent of the time, it doesn’t and the 10 percent that does, you can handle it.’ So we’re pretty much equipped to be able psychologically and physically to handle just about anything that comes at us.”

According to stress.org, the key to reducing stress is to prevent it. Getting enough sleep, a proper diet, avoiding excess caffeine, and other stimulants and taking time out to relax may be helpful in this regard.


Print pagePDF page

You may also like...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Contact